Category Archives: Strategies

Relavence of the Dividend Yield

What’s so important about the dividend yield? Why do I focus on it equally with the stock price? As a dividend investor I like to have my money work for me with little effort or worry. All investments come with risks. I like to mitigate mine. I do this with dividends. With dividends I don’t rely solely on share price to receive a return on my investment. Also, dividends are what I get paid to have my money tied up for the long term.

What does the dividend yield mean to me? How does it relate to my own investment strategy? I look at the dividend yield as a way to determine how good the stock price is in relation to the dividends being paid. The higher the yield the better the stock price is in relation to the dividend. Let me explain using 2 stocks.

                                        Div Yd   Share $   Div $
Home Depot ($HD)   2.15% $272.81 $6.00
Lowes ($LOW)             1.48% $159.82 $2.40

As you can see Home Depot has a high dividend yield not just because of the high dividend it is paying but because the high dividend relative to its share price. If the share price were to increase by 10% the dividend yield would drop to 2%. Additionally, if the share price dropped by 10% the dividend yield would increase to 2.44%.

Again, you can see that Home DEpot and Lowes have dividend yields of 2.15% & 1.48%, respectively. Now, if you took their share prices and switched, you’d end up with a dividend yield of 3.75% for Home Depot (6/159.82) and 0.87% for Lowes. The dividend yield can be affected by a change in either share price or dividend payout.

I view the dividend payout as a gauge to determine how good the share price is in relation to what they payout in dividends. As I stated before, this is just one of the factors I use to decide what stocks to invest in.

Of course, there still are other factors that I look at, such as, P/E Ratio, EPS, & PEG. I also start with companies that have a large MOAT. I don’t prefer to invest in companies which may have an uncertain future, regardless of how much they pay in dividends. But overall, it starts with the Dividend Yield.

Due Diligence

Whenever you come across a company that you’re interested in investing into it is best to make sure that you do your due diligence before you invest. The reason you want to do this is to:

  1. Minimize the risk of losing your investment. All investments have an element of risk associated with them. But a smart investor wants to minimize that risk.
  2. Know something other than the company’s name and stock price. How is the company doing? Is it a good investment? This last point is based on your pwn investment criteria.

In order to do either of the above you need to access the company’s fundamental information. From there you need to be able to calculate certain benchmark data. There are many benchmark calculations that are suggested but in this post I will highlight the ones from the Income Statement. I may not look at all of these but these are the most common ones investors suggest.

  1. Net Revenue (Revenue – COGS)
  2. Gross Profit Margin (Gross Profit – Operating Expenses)
  3. Operating Margin (Operating Income /Revenue)
  4. Post-Tax Income (Pre-Tax Income – Income Tax)
  5. Net Income Margin (Net Income/Revenue)

I may not check each and everyone but I am interested in a company’s Gross Profit and their Net Revenue. This tells me how well the company is doing in its market niche and how well they are managing/controlling their operations. The benchmark for these is up to each individual investor to establish. I usually don’t calculate these for single companies but as a comparison between multiple companies.

I have limited funds available to invest so that if the other criteria benchmarks are relatively close with each other I use these benchmark data to narrow down my selections. The reason that I use benchmarks, even though I am a dividend investor and growth in stock price is secondary, because I want to make sure that the company will be around for the long-term. I’m not looking to invest for the stock price to jump up within a relatively short time. I’m looking to capture a passive income for the long-term. Once I buy a company stock I’m reluctant to sell unless the company cuts their dividend payout 2 times.

Here are some other calculations you can use to narrow down your selections:

7 Ways on How to Invest For Your Retirement

Guest Article By Kivale Joshua

Investment Plan for Your Retirement

There so many investment plans available out there. The following points will guide you to choose the most appropriate one for you with lesser risks and commitments to manage. The points are based on the fact that, after a while they are going to be appreciating business ventures for your retirement.

1. Annuity

Annuity is a plan whereby an insurance company in exchange for purchase price enters into a contract to pay an agreed amount of money every year while the annuitant is still alive.
Annuitant- is the person on whose life the contract depends.
Annuity- is the amount of money paid to the annuitant.

The benefits of an annuity especially when used in connection with retirement provision is that it would ensure that the retiree has an income for a convenient number of years. The best type of annuity is deferred annuity because it gives you life time benefits.

2. Bonds

A bond is a loan to either a government or a corporation, whereby the borrower agrees to pay a fixed sum of interest usually semi-annually, until your investment in full. Treasury bonds are secure, medium to long-term investments that typically offer you instant payment every six months throughout the bond maturity. Treasury bonds have a fixed rate meaning that the interest rate determined at auction is locked in for the entire life of the bond. This makes treasury bonds predictable, long term source of income.

3. Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs)

Exchange traded fund is an investment fund traded on stock exchanges just like stocks. An ETF holds assets such as stocks, oil future, foreign currency, commodities or bonds and generally operates with an arbitrage mechanism to keep its trading close to its net asset value, although deviations can occasionally occur. These assets are divided into shares where shareholders do not directly own or have direct claim to the investments in the fund.
ETF shareholders are entitled to a proportion of the profits such as earned interest or dividends paid.

4. Stocks

In Kenya the main stock market is Nairobi Stock Exchange (NSE). A stock market is a place where public limited companies and other financial institutions, come to buy and sell bonds and other derivatives. NSE acts as a third-party broker and allows investors to buy and sell shares independently through share dealing platforms. You can directly and indirectly invest in stocks. Direct investment means that you buy shares from a company and become a shareholder while indirect means you invest in more than one company therefore spreading the risk. Indirect investment is done through an open-ended fund and the money is secure so that even the company defaults the money is still safe.

5. Mutual Funds

Mutual funds are some of the most overlooked yet probably the easiest way to invest much more than both stocks and bonds. A mutual fund is a pool of money, often from similar minded investors. You can sell your shares when and if you want. All shareholders of the fund benefit from the fund and share in any losses. There are five categories of mutual funds where you can choose the one which best suits you.

6. Real Estate

Real estate is a retirement investment plan you should never overlook. Landon said ‘look for what’s going to give you the most bang for your back’. Real estate as a front is a very lucrative opening. However, one must research the market and know the current and emerging trends in the sector. The location of the real estate matters a lot and should be well selected. Some of the major locations can be near universities, developing towns or big company sites. In any investment capital becomes the main organ to jump start the investment. Research on different financial organizations and try to compare their payment and funding terms. You can still opt to become a Real Estate Trader. A real estate trader is one who buys property with the intention of holding them for a short period and sell to make a profit.

7. Pension Plan

Pension plan is a retirement plan that requires an employer to make contributions into a pool of funds aside for a worker’s future benefit. The pool of funds is invested on the employee’s behalf, and the earnings on the investment given to the worker upon retirement. In Kenya even self-employed workers can still contribute to the social security fund to help them when time comes.

Retirement is a process where every living worker must come to terms to. Retirement is just like any other investment but a more crucial one since when you retire you productivity goes low due to health and age. You can start now and by the time you retire have significant benefits that can help you live a befitting like after retirement. Take a step today and plan to invest for your retirement now and be a happy retired worker living a good life and building the economy even at old age.

KIVALE JOSHUA
https://www.upwork.com/o/profiles/users/_~017745077c7c727711/
visit my profile on the above link to contact me for more well researched content writing.

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Kivale_Joshua/2502529

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Importance Of Stock Price To A Dividend Investor

How important is the stock price to a dividend investor. Speaking only for myself, stock price is a little less important than the dividend payout and the number of shares owned. As long as the stock price remains within the 52 week price range, all is well for me. If it set a new low, I will definitely take another look at the company to determine if I want to remain invested with it. To me the share price is an opportunity for me to buy additional shares so that I can get more dividends.

You find a lot of stock investor stressed out because of the activity with the stock market, specifically when the market has a downturn or pullback in the prices. That’s because that is all they are banking on, the overall value of the total stock. I don’t sweat it when my stocks take a decrease in price. I look at it as an opportunity to purchase more stocks at a price less than what I originally paid. Don’t get me wrong, I still think that stock price is important but not the #1 factor. It’s in the Top 5. You could end up with a stock like Just Energy Group ($JE) that had a 1 day drop in price of 95% back in Sept-Oct.

That’s too much of a risk for me. I can’t eliminate all risk but I tend to prefer mitigating it as much as a I can.

Managing The Retirement Income Portfolio: The Plan

Guest Article By Steve Selengut 

The reason people assume the risks of investing in the first place is the prospect of achieving a higher “realized” rate of return than is attainable in a risk free environment… i.e., an FDIC insured bank account featuring compound interest.

Risk comes in various forms, but the average income investor’s primary concerns are “financial” and, when investing for income without the proper mindset, “market” risk.

  • Financial risk involves the ability of corporations, government entities, and even individuals, to honor their financial commitments.
  • Market risk refers to the absolute certainty that all marketable securities will experience fluctuation in market value… sometimes more so than others, but this “reality” needs to be planned for and dealt with, never feared.
  • Question: Is it the demand for individual stocks that push up funds and ETF prices, or vice versa?

We can minimize financial risk by selecting only high quality (investment grade) securities, by diversifying properly, and by understanding that market value change is actually “income harmless”. By having a plan of action for dealing with “market risk”, we can actually turn it into investment opportunity.

  • What do banks do to get the amount of interest they guarantee to depositors? They invest in securities that pay a fixed rate of income regardless of changes in market value.

You don’t have to be a professional investment manager to manage your investment portfolio professionally. But, you do need to have a long term plan and know something about asset allocation… an often misused and misunderstood portfolio planning/organization tool.

  • For example, annual portfolio “rebalancing” is a symptom of dysfunctional asset allocation. Asset allocation needs to control every investment decision throughout the year, every year, regardless of changes in market value.

It is important to recognize, as well, that you do not need hi tech computer programs, economic scenario simulators, inflation estimators, or stock market projections to get yourself lined up properly with your retirement income target.

What you do need is common sense, reasonable expectations, patience, discipline, soft hands, and an oversized driver. The “KISS principle” should be the foundation of your investment plan; compound earnings the epoxy that keeps the structure safe and secure over the developmental period.

  • Over the past ten years, such risk free saving has been unable to compete with riskier mediums because of artificially low interest rates, forcing traditional “savers” into the mutual fund and ETF market place.
  • (Funds and ETFs have become the “new” stock market, a place where individual equity prices have become invisible, questions about company fundamentals meet with blank stares, and media talking heads tell us that individuals are no longer in the stock market).

Additionally, an emphasis on “working capital” (as opposed to market value) will help you through all four basic portfolio management processes. (Business majors, remember PLOC?) Finally, a chance to use something you learned in college!

Planning for Retirement

The retirement income portfolio (nearly all investment portfolios become retirement portfolios eventually) is the financial hero that appears on the scene just in time to fill the income gap between what you need for retirement and the guaranteed payments you will receive from Uncle and/or past employers.

How potent the force of the super hero, however, does not depend on the size of the market value number; from a retirement perspective, it’s the income produced inside the costume that shields us from financial villains. Which of these heroes do you want fueling your wallet?

  • A million dollar VTINX portfolio that produces about $19,200 in annual spending money.
  • A million dollar, well diversified, income CEF portfolio that generates more than $70,000 annually… even with the same equity allocation as the Vanguard fund (just under 30%).
  • A million dollar portfolio of GOOG, NFLX, and FB that produces no spending money at all.

I’ve heard said that a 4% draw from a retirement income portfolio is about normal, but what if that’s not enough to fill your “income gap” and/or more than the amount produced by the portfolio. If both of these “what ifs” prove true… well, it’s not a pretty picture.

And it becomes uglier rather quickly when you look inside your actual 401k, IRA, TIAA CREF, ROTH, etc. portfolio and realize that it is not producing even close to 4% in actual spendable income. Total return, yes. Realized spendable income, ‘fraid not.

  • Sure your portfolio has been “growing” in market value over the past ten years, but it is likely that no effort has been made to increase the annual income it produces. The financial markets live on market value analytics, and so long as the market goes up every year, we’re told that everything is fine.
  • So what if your “income gap” is more than 4% of your portfolio; what if your portfolio is producing less than 2% like the Vanguard Retirement Income Fund; or what if the market stops growing by more than 4% per year… while you are still depleting capital at a 5%, 6% or even a 7% clip???

The less popular (available only in individual portfolios) Closed End Income Fund approach has been around for decades, and has all of the “what ifs” covered. They, in combination with Investment Grade Value Stocks (IGVS), have the unique ability to take advantage of market value fluctuations in either direction, increasing portfolio income production with every monthly reinvestment procedure.

  • Monthly reinvestment must never become a DRIP (dividend reinvestment plan) approach, please. Monthly income must be pooled for selective reinvestment where the most “bang for the buck” can be achieved. The objective is to reduce cost basis per share and increase position yield… with one click of the mouse.

A retirement income program that is focused only on market value growth is doomed from the getgo, even in IGVS. All portfolio plans need an income focused asset allocation of at least 30%, oftentimes more, but never less. All individual security purchase decision-making needs to support the operative “growth purpose vs. income purpose” asset allocation plan.

  • The “Working Capital Model” is a 40+ years tested auto pilot asset allocation system that pretty much guarantees annual income growth when used properly with a minimum 40% income purpose allocation.

The following bullet points apply to the asset allocation plan running individual taxable and tax deferred portfolios… not 401k plans because they typically can’t produce adequate income. Such plans should be allocated to maximum possible safety within six years of retirement, and rolled over to a personally directed IRA as soon as physically possible.

  • The “income purpose” asset allocation begins at 30% of working capital, regardless of portfolio size, investor age, or amount of liquid assets available for investment.
  • Start up portfolios (under $30,000) should have no equity component, and no more than 50% until six figures are reached. From $100k (until age 45), as little as 30% to income is acceptable, but not particularly income productive.
  • At age 45, or $250k, move to 40% income purpose; 50% at age 50; 60% at age 55, and 70% income purpose securities from age 65 or retirement, whichever comes first.
  • The income purpose side of the portfolio should be kept as fully invested as possible, and all asset allocation determinations must be based on working capital (i.e., portfolio cost basis); cash is considered part of the equity, or “growth purpose” allocation
  • Equity investments are limited to seven year experienced equity CEFs and/or “investment grade value stocks” (as defined in the “Brainwashing” book ).

Even if you are young, you need to stop smoking heavily and to develop a growing stream of income. If you keep the income growing, the market value growth (that you are expected to worship) will take care of itself. Remember, higher market value may increase hat size, but it doesn’t pay the bills.

So this is the plan. Determine your retirement income needs; start your investment program with an income focus; add equities as you age and your portfolio becomes more significant; when retirement looms, or portfolio size becomes serious, make your income purpose allocation serious as well.

Don’t worry about inflation, the markets, or the economy… your asset allocation will keep you moving in the right direction while it focuses on growing your income every year.

  • This is the key point of the whole “retirement income readiness” scenario. Every dollar added to the portfolio (or earned by the portfolio) is reallocated according to “working capital” asset allocation. When the income allocation is above 40%, you will see the income rising magically every quarter… regardless of what’s going on in the financial markets.
  • Note that all IGVS pay dividends that are also divvied up according to the asset allocation.

If you are within ten years of retirement age, a growing income stream is precisely what you want to see. Applying the same approach to your IRAs (including the 401k rollover), will produce enough income to pay the RMD (required mandatory distribution) and put you in a position to say, without reservation:

Neither a stock market correction nor rising interest rates will have a negative impact on my retirement income; in fact, I’ll be able to grow my income even better in either environment.

My articles always describe aspects of an investment process I have been using since the 1970’s, as described in my book, The Brainwashing of the American Investor. All the disciplines, concepts, and processes described therein work together to produce (in my experience) a safer, more income productive, investment experience. No implementation should be undertaken without a complete understanding of all aspects of the program.

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Steve_Selengut/12786

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Modifying Your Investment Strategy

I’ve decide that it was time to modify my investment strategy. Not because it was wrong but because it wasn’t moving things along fast enough. Again, as I’ve stated before I have a timeline that is considerably shorter than the normal “rule of thumb” timeline of 30 years. My timeline is only 5 years, albeit a rolling 5 years. One cannot turn back the clock and try to redo the past so all we can do is work with what we have. My goal is still to stop working and live off of the dividends. To do so I have to have a extremely larger amount of money invested than I do presently. To this end I am putting any discretionary funds into investments.

I have outlined my strategy previous but now I’m going to be adding another point. And that is that I will be focusing on companies and funds that pay dividends on a monthly basis. Quarterly payouts are nice, but monthly is much better. If you are a believer in compound interest then you know what I am getting at. Why wait for the quarterly dividend in order to re-invest when you can re-invest the dividend on a monthly basis. All other criteria in my strategy still holds.

My focus will be Exchange Traded Funds (ETF). This will allow me to diversify and to minimize my risk. I get to own a little bit of everything instead of trying to own everything all at once. I also don’t have to keep a constant eye on the market value to determine when the stock no longer performs to meet my goals. Someone else does that. Yes, I’m willing to pay someone to do that…to a limit. I still have my criteria of not getting ETFs that charge over 0.6% in costs. There is a high yield ETF that has a dividend yield of 7.77%. Seems good. Except that the Expense Ratio is 1.25%. Morningstar rates the Risk as Above Average and rates the Returns as Low. So, I am not going to blindly invest just on a high dividend yield. I am not a great risk taker. Especially with an abbreviated timeline. I like my risks to be Average or Below. The returns should be rated Average or Above.

So, what caused me to tweak my strategy? I had viewed the video 5 Monthly HIGH Dividend ETFs (5%+) ETFs that Pay Monthly Dividends that I had posted on my blog previously. This video is put out by Learn To Invest. He does put out quite a few useful tutorial videos about investing. This one got me to thinking that his presentation of ETFs could help me accelerate my investment activity and thus increase my investment values at a higher pace.  So, I have to determine if I should liquidate all or some of my individual stocks and put the proceeds into ETFs or do I just invest my money solely into ETFs going forward from now on, leaving the individual stocks untouched.  

So, follow my blog to learn what I end up doing. Maybe you’ll get something out of this taht you can apply to your investment strategy.

What is my investment strategy?

In discussing investments with others I am asked what is my investment strategy? I am going to try to outline my strategy here but you must remember that the strategy is a bit broad and in special cases I will make exceptions to certain criteria.

I only invest in:
1. Long standing, existing businesses. I tend to avoid emerging/startup companies and IPO’s.
2. Companies that pay dividends. This is the rule that is pretty much set in stone. No dividend then no investment from me.
3. Companies that have a dividend yield of between 2.5 to 5%.
4. Companies that have at least a 5 year history of dividend payouts.
5. Companies that show a positive dividend growth.
6. Companies that are rated at Average or below in risk and Average and above in returns.
7. Companies whose stock price allows me to maximize the quantity of share that I own.

The above points are all relative. Such as the dividend yield. If a company is paying out a dividend of $6/share and it’s stock price is $200, this gives me a yield of 3%. This passes my criteria.for dividend yields but does not pass my ability to maximize the number of shares that I own because I am limited by my investment budget. If I have only $200 to invest each month, buying the one stock for $200 only gets me that 1 share. But if I can buy another stock that sells for $50/share and pays 3% dividend yield I can get 4 shares. The dividends I can get will be the same for both at $6 but when I re-invest the $6 I can only get 0.03 shares of the $200/share stock but 0.12 shares of the $50/share stock. I try to maximize shares owned and maximize dividends earned.

I am focusing on the growth of my stock investments based on share growth in addition to any increase in stock price value. Share growth is more critical to me than share price growth. I will increase my position with a specific stock if the share price drops or increases no more than 10%. If the share price increases more than 10% I will just hold and wait for the next DRIP.

I’ll be detailing my different strategy points in later postings.

When Do I Sell?

I haven’t been investing for that long of a time. I’ve acquired a few company stocks and ETF’s. But my sales have been few. Right now I’m looking for sell all of my Obalon (OBLN) stock because it is one of the first ones that I bought when I was first starting out. At that time I really didn’t have a clear idea of what I wanted to do. I didn’t have a strategy. I bought Obalon and and a couple of others because they were companies that were in the healthcare industry. That was it. None of them paid any dividends and there wasn’t any real growth with them.
After developing my own investment strategy I decided that the money I had invested in those companies could be better used with other investments. I sold the others at a bit of a profit but held Obalon because it was trading under what I paid for it. I decided to wait to see if the price would come back.

When I first started investing I opened an investment account with Robinhood. When I did that I received a free stock for Lyft. I decided to hold that one for a little while. When I was given that share of stock the price was around $42/share. It also wasn’t paying any dividends. I held that stock for a little while and the price dropped down to the low $30’s per share. The stock fluctuated in that neighborhood for a while. I finally decided to sell my share and put the money to better use.

Now I have developed my own investment strategy and I feel confident that I know more than I did when I first started. I now invest in dividend stocks. If a company doesn’t pay dividends then I don’t have a real interest in investing my money with them. Am I missing out on windfall returns? Maybe. But I’m also missing out on catastrophic losses. I’m at an age when I can ill afford to lose money because I don’t have as much time to recover from major losses. Also, if I am going to be investing in a company for the long term then I want to get paid for my time that I am waiting for the stock to grow, thus the dividend payout. The dividend payout is the company’s payment to me for being patient and sticking it out with them.

So, based on all of the above when do I sell my stock? I will only consider selling my stock when either of the two conditions below are met:
1. The company drastically cuts their dividend payout 2 times or more in a row.
2. The stock price increases 200%+.

So far I’ve been lucky in that none of my investments have had their dividend payouts cut. But I will tolerate 1 such payout cut but if they go to 2 in a row, they’re history.

What’s more important, stock price or dividend yield?

The answer to the question will depend on your investing strategy and your goal. Speaking for myself, I prioritize on dividend yield with an eye on stock price. Regardless of either one, the stability and longevity of the company is paramount. I’m the type of person that would have missed out of Tesla when it first came out. I don’t speculate/gamble with my money. My goal is to create an income stream from my investment where I can stop working (I am overdue to officially retire and I still work because I have bills to pay). Now, in order to reach that goal my strategy is to invest heavily in dividend stocks (those stocks that pay you cash dividend periodically). If the company hasn’t paid any dividend consistently for 5 years, I’m just not going to seriously consider investing my money with them. Am I missing out on some tremendous windfall profit? Probably. But then I’m missing out on all those tremendous jackpots because I don’t go to casinos, either.
When I look at a stock or fund I look to see what they are paying and how often. I then look at the stock price and determine if the stock price is worth paying to get that dividend. Again, this is a subjective determination for me. I don’t believe that there’s a right or wrong answer. Two people can look at a stable company that has been in business for a long time (i.e. Coca Cola or Intel) and based on the criteria I used, one person can decide that the stock price is worth it while the other one feels that it isn’t. Their choices based on their goals, strategy, and comfort zones.

I’ve come across a few stocks/funds that someone said was a great investment based on the dividend yield. The last one I encountered was YYY (Amplify ETF TR High Income ETF). The stock price is cheap at approx. $15/share. The dividend yield is at 10.39%. Very high. In the relationship to the share price this comes out to about $1.56/share. So for $1500 you can buy about 100 shares of this ETF and get $156 in dividends. Sounds great? To me the one factor that makes me pause is the Expense Ratio (both Gross & Net). It’s at 2.17%. I like my expense ratios below 0.10%. This is a deal-breaker.

In addition to dividend yields & payouts, and price shares I’m looking at expense ratios. I don’t want to invest in a fund with high dividend yields that end up being eaten up by fees. The dividend history and growth are also important to me. What about share price? Well, it is important in determining how many shares I can buy and the future acquisition plans going forward. If the share price drops it’s an opportunity to buy more (barring that all other factors remain basically the same) shares and collect even more dividends. If it goes up than the value of my shares increases and I still get to collect dividends.

VHT vs. VGT; Adding a New Sector To My Portfolio

For those that follow my blog and my Twitter feeds, you are aware that my current portfolio is heavy with ETFs, About 82% of my investment portfolio consists of ETFs and the balance of 17% are individual company stocks. Within those ETFs I have the following areas invested in:

  1. Real Estate – VNQ (Vanguard Real Estate ETF).
  2. Energy – VDE (Vanguard Energy ETF)

The other 2 Vanguard funds are concentrated on high value & high dividends across many sectors (VFIAX & VYM).

I would like to add a healthcare ETF and a technology ETF to my portfolio. I am looking at VGT and VHT. Both are pricey by my standards but both are paying decent dividends, and that what I in this for. So, I now have to go through the decision process of which one do I invest in first. I will be investing in both but it’ll be completed over the next few months. I do have other expenses that I am obligated to handle first.

medical caduceus black white outline clipart

I looked at the data for VHT (Vanguard Health Care ETF) via my TD Ameritrade account. Currently the fund is trading at $204.84 per share which is a bit high for my purposes. In looking at this fund’s 52 week range you see that its share price is at the end of the high range. The chart shows the fund’s value is increasing so I doubt that the price will be dropping drastically, barring any unforeseen circumstances. But now for the key question. What about the dividends? VHT has an annualized payout of $2.55/share (a 1.24% yield). If the share price were to drop to the other end of the price spectrum of $138.11 the yield would then be 1.85%. The average 5 year dividend growth rate is 23.01%.

According to Morningstar the risk factor for this fund shows that it’s rated as Below Average and the returns are rated as Average. Both of which are a positive factor for me. Morningstar has the fund designated as a Large Blend fund. The one thing that I am not happy with for this fund is that the Net Expense Ratio is about 0.10%. This is the maximum I would prefer.

The market Return for the funds is 6.39% so far for 2020, For 2019 it was 21.86%. Some of the company stocks that are included in this fund are:

  1. JNJ – Johnson & Johnson
  2. UNH – UnitedHealth Group
  3. PFE – Pfizer Inc
  4. MRK – Merck & Co Inc
  5. ABT – Abbott Laboratories
  6. TMO – Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc
  7. ABBV – AbbVie Inc
  8. AMGN – Amgen Inc
  9. BMY – Bristol-Myers Squibb Co
  10. MDT – Medtronic PLC

cloud computing clipart

The other Vanguard fund that I checked out on TD Ameritrade was VGT (Vanguard Information Technology Index Fund ETF). This fund is another pricey one that is trading at its 52 week high range of $313.59, Morningstar has this fund rated Below Average risk and Above Average return. They also have it designated as a Large Growth fund.

In digging into the data for this fund I find that the dividend payout is annualized at $3.00/share (a 0.96% yield). In screening just for high paying dividend stock with a yield greater than 5%, this fund would not have shown up on my radar. But is still pays a decent dividend even if the share price makes it a challenge for the average person to purchase more than just a couple of shares. The Net Expense ratio is also at the maximum preferred ratio of 0.10%.

The returns for this fund for 2020 so far are 21.33%. For 2019 the returns were 48.61. Some of the company stocks that are included in this fund are:

  1. AAPL – Apple
  2. MSFT – Microsoft
  3. V – Visa
  4. MA – Mastercard
  5. NVDA – Nvidia
  6. PYPL – PayPal
  7. ADBE – Adobe
  8. INTC – Intel
  9. CSCO – Cisco
  10. CRM – Salesforce

I really like both of these funds but I can’t afford to buy both of them at this time. So, I have to make a decision which one I want to buy first. It comes down to 2 factors: a) share price, and b) dividend payout (after all, that’s what I’m interested in). They’re both pretty close in both of these areas.

The final decision at this time for me will be that I will be buying the funds in this order:

  1. VHT (Vanguard Health Care ETF)
  2. VGT (Vanguard Information Technology Index Fund ETF)