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7 Ways on How to Invest For Your Retirement

Guest Article By Kivale Joshua

Investment Plan for Your Retirement

There so many investment plans available out there. The following points will guide you to choose the most appropriate one for you with lesser risks and commitments to manage. The points are based on the fact that, after a while they are going to be appreciating business ventures for your retirement.

1. Annuity

Annuity is a plan whereby an insurance company in exchange for purchase price enters into a contract to pay an agreed amount of money every year while the annuitant is still alive.
Annuitant- is the person on whose life the contract depends.
Annuity- is the amount of money paid to the annuitant.

The benefits of an annuity especially when used in connection with retirement provision is that it would ensure that the retiree has an income for a convenient number of years. The best type of annuity is deferred annuity because it gives you life time benefits.

2. Bonds

A bond is a loan to either a government or a corporation, whereby the borrower agrees to pay a fixed sum of interest usually semi-annually, until your investment in full. Treasury bonds are secure, medium to long-term investments that typically offer you instant payment every six months throughout the bond maturity. Treasury bonds have a fixed rate meaning that the interest rate determined at auction is locked in for the entire life of the bond. This makes treasury bonds predictable, long term source of income.

3. Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs)

Exchange traded fund is an investment fund traded on stock exchanges just like stocks. An ETF holds assets such as stocks, oil future, foreign currency, commodities or bonds and generally operates with an arbitrage mechanism to keep its trading close to its net asset value, although deviations can occasionally occur. These assets are divided into shares where shareholders do not directly own or have direct claim to the investments in the fund.
ETF shareholders are entitled to a proportion of the profits such as earned interest or dividends paid.

4. Stocks

In Kenya the main stock market is Nairobi Stock Exchange (NSE). A stock market is a place where public limited companies and other financial institutions, come to buy and sell bonds and other derivatives. NSE acts as a third-party broker and allows investors to buy and sell shares independently through share dealing platforms. You can directly and indirectly invest in stocks. Direct investment means that you buy shares from a company and become a shareholder while indirect means you invest in more than one company therefore spreading the risk. Indirect investment is done through an open-ended fund and the money is secure so that even the company defaults the money is still safe.

5. Mutual Funds

Mutual funds are some of the most overlooked yet probably the easiest way to invest much more than both stocks and bonds. A mutual fund is a pool of money, often from similar minded investors. You can sell your shares when and if you want. All shareholders of the fund benefit from the fund and share in any losses. There are five categories of mutual funds where you can choose the one which best suits you.

6. Real Estate

Real estate is a retirement investment plan you should never overlook. Landon said ‘look for what’s going to give you the most bang for your back’. Real estate as a front is a very lucrative opening. However, one must research the market and know the current and emerging trends in the sector. The location of the real estate matters a lot and should be well selected. Some of the major locations can be near universities, developing towns or big company sites. In any investment capital becomes the main organ to jump start the investment. Research on different financial organizations and try to compare their payment and funding terms. You can still opt to become a Real Estate Trader. A real estate trader is one who buys property with the intention of holding them for a short period and sell to make a profit.

7. Pension Plan

Pension plan is a retirement plan that requires an employer to make contributions into a pool of funds aside for a worker’s future benefit. The pool of funds is invested on the employee’s behalf, and the earnings on the investment given to the worker upon retirement. In Kenya even self-employed workers can still contribute to the social security fund to help them when time comes.

Retirement is a process where every living worker must come to terms to. Retirement is just like any other investment but a more crucial one since when you retire you productivity goes low due to health and age. You can start now and by the time you retire have significant benefits that can help you live a befitting like after retirement. Take a step today and plan to invest for your retirement now and be a happy retired worker living a good life and building the economy even at old age.

KIVALE JOSHUA
https://www.upwork.com/o/profiles/users/_~017745077c7c727711/
visit my profile on the above link to contact me for more well researched content writing.

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Kivale_Joshua/2502529

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My Current Investment Positions

I am fairly pleased with my current portfolio since I developed my own investment strategy. My investment activity is still not as accelerated as I’d want it to be but slow and steady is good. I got rid of all but one of the first stocks I bought before I really knew what I was doing and have been focusing my effort on investing in dividend stocks.

I have been investing at least $200/month. I wish it could be more but reality is a bitch. Reality is what we normal people have to deal with regardless of what the so-called “investment experts” on the internet say.

But so far, my portfolio as increased 13.51%. My holdings:

$ABR
$ACRE
$KO
$O
$OBLN
$T
$VDE
$VNQ
$VYM

I’m also looking to diversify my portfolio a bit more by buying some bond EFT’s (i.e. either $VTIP or $VTEB). Also, with the current pandemic it might be good to invest in a pharma company. But which one? I might look to buy some $VHT, an ETF that invests in pharma companies within the Healthcare sector.

When Do I Sell?

I haven’t been investing for that long of a time. I’ve acquired a few company stocks and ETF’s. But my sales have been few. Right now I’m looking for sell all of my Obalon (OBLN) stock because it is one of the first ones that I bought when I was first starting out. At that time I really didn’t have a clear idea of what I wanted to do. I didn’t have a strategy. I bought Obalon and and a couple of others because they were companies that were in the healthcare industry. That was it. None of them paid any dividends and there wasn’t any real growth with them.
After developing my own investment strategy I decided that the money I had invested in those companies could be better used with other investments. I sold the others at a bit of a profit but held Obalon because it was trading under what I paid for it. I decided to wait to see if the price would come back.

When I first started investing I opened an investment account with Robinhood. When I did that I received a free stock for Lyft. I decided to hold that one for a little while. When I was given that share of stock the price was around $42/share. It also wasn’t paying any dividends. I held that stock for a little while and the price dropped down to the low $30’s per share. The stock fluctuated in that neighborhood for a while. I finally decided to sell my share and put the money to better use.

Now I have developed my own investment strategy and I feel confident that I know more than I did when I first started. I now invest in dividend stocks. If a company doesn’t pay dividends then I don’t have a real interest in investing my money with them. Am I missing out on windfall returns? Maybe. But I’m also missing out on catastrophic losses. I’m at an age when I can ill afford to lose money because I don’t have as much time to recover from major losses. Also, if I am going to be investing in a company for the long term then I want to get paid for my time that I am waiting for the stock to grow, thus the dividend payout. The dividend payout is the company’s payment to me for being patient and sticking it out with them.

So, based on all of the above when do I sell my stock? I will only consider selling my stock when either of the two conditions below are met:
1. The company drastically cuts their dividend payout 2 times or more in a row.
2. The stock price increases 200%+.

So far I’ve been lucky in that none of my investments have had their dividend payouts cut. But I will tolerate 1 such payout cut but if they go to 2 in a row, they’re history.

VHT vs. VGT; Adding a New Sector To My Portfolio

For those that follow my blog and my Twitter feeds, you are aware that my current portfolio is heavy with ETFs, About 82% of my investment portfolio consists of ETFs and the balance of 17% are individual company stocks. Within those ETFs I have the following areas invested in:

  1. Real Estate – VNQ (Vanguard Real Estate ETF).
  2. Energy – VDE (Vanguard Energy ETF)

The other 2 Vanguard funds are concentrated on high value & high dividends across many sectors (VFIAX & VYM).

I would like to add a healthcare ETF and a technology ETF to my portfolio. I am looking at VGT and VHT. Both are pricey by my standards but both are paying decent dividends, and that what I in this for. So, I now have to go through the decision process of which one do I invest in first. I will be investing in both but it’ll be completed over the next few months. I do have other expenses that I am obligated to handle first.

medical caduceus black white outline clipart

I looked at the data for VHT (Vanguard Health Care ETF) via my TD Ameritrade account. Currently the fund is trading at $204.84 per share which is a bit high for my purposes. In looking at this fund’s 52 week range you see that its share price is at the end of the high range. The chart shows the fund’s value is increasing so I doubt that the price will be dropping drastically, barring any unforeseen circumstances. But now for the key question. What about the dividends? VHT has an annualized payout of $2.55/share (a 1.24% yield). If the share price were to drop to the other end of the price spectrum of $138.11 the yield would then be 1.85%. The average 5 year dividend growth rate is 23.01%.

According to Morningstar the risk factor for this fund shows that it’s rated as Below Average and the returns are rated as Average. Both of which are a positive factor for me. Morningstar has the fund designated as a Large Blend fund. The one thing that I am not happy with for this fund is that the Net Expense Ratio is about 0.10%. This is the maximum I would prefer.

The market Return for the funds is 6.39% so far for 2020, For 2019 it was 21.86%. Some of the company stocks that are included in this fund are:

  1. JNJ – Johnson & Johnson
  2. UNH – UnitedHealth Group
  3. PFE – Pfizer Inc
  4. MRK – Merck & Co Inc
  5. ABT – Abbott Laboratories
  6. TMO – Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc
  7. ABBV – AbbVie Inc
  8. AMGN – Amgen Inc
  9. BMY – Bristol-Myers Squibb Co
  10. MDT – Medtronic PLC

cloud computing clipart

The other Vanguard fund that I checked out on TD Ameritrade was VGT (Vanguard Information Technology Index Fund ETF). This fund is another pricey one that is trading at its 52 week high range of $313.59, Morningstar has this fund rated Below Average risk and Above Average return. They also have it designated as a Large Growth fund.

In digging into the data for this fund I find that the dividend payout is annualized at $3.00/share (a 0.96% yield). In screening just for high paying dividend stock with a yield greater than 5%, this fund would not have shown up on my radar. But is still pays a decent dividend even if the share price makes it a challenge for the average person to purchase more than just a couple of shares. The Net Expense ratio is also at the maximum preferred ratio of 0.10%.

The returns for this fund for 2020 so far are 21.33%. For 2019 the returns were 48.61. Some of the company stocks that are included in this fund are:

  1. AAPL – Apple
  2. MSFT – Microsoft
  3. V – Visa
  4. MA – Mastercard
  5. NVDA – Nvidia
  6. PYPL – PayPal
  7. ADBE – Adobe
  8. INTC – Intel
  9. CSCO – Cisco
  10. CRM – Salesforce

I really like both of these funds but I can’t afford to buy both of them at this time. So, I have to make a decision which one I want to buy first. It comes down to 2 factors: a) share price, and b) dividend payout (after all, that’s what I’m interested in). They’re both pretty close in both of these areas.

The final decision at this time for me will be that I will be buying the funds in this order:

  1. VHT (Vanguard Health Care ETF)
  2. VGT (Vanguard Information Technology Index Fund ETF)

My ETF Portfolio

I was glad to see that my Vanguard ETF portfolio grew in value. Even though I’m investing for the long term benefits, I just wanted to check and see what the funds were doing. I have another portfolio of individual stocks I am invested in but the ETF portfolio hold the most promise. My ETF portfolio currently holds the following ETFs:

  1. VDE – Vanguard Energy
  2. VNQ – Vanguard Real Estate
  3. VYM – Vanguard High Dividend Yield

Yes, they are all Vanguard funds. I have a preference for Vanguard. This is not to say any others one, like Fidelity, are worse but I just prefer Vanguard. Checking today’s market value and I find that the portfolio has increased by +3.07%. I won’t have a comparison with the S&P 500 or the NASDAQ Composite until the end of the day. I’ll be check back then.

I only started on my investment journey since the beginning of the year with ETFs and stocks. Last year I started my 401K with my employer. What’s in my 401K?

  1. VFIAX – Vanguard 500 Index Fund Admiral Shares

Now, I look at other factors with my funds to decide if I increase my position with any or all of them or look for another investment (except the VFIAX, which is automatically invested into).

  1. VDE is currently trading at $48.85. This toward the low end of its 52 week range. I may end up buying a couple of more shares of this fund. The expense ratio is high for my liking (0.10%) but the fund pays $2.74/share (a yield of 5.61%). VDE invests in giant-cap and large-cap U.S. energy stocks.
  2. VNQ is trading at $80.71 which is right in the mid-range of the 52 week range. This one is one that I’ll keep an eye on. I’m not overly happy with the expense ratio of 0.12% but the dividend paid is $3.11/share (a yield of 3.85%). Situations do change so this one will stay on HOLD.
  3. VYM is my pride & joy. I love this fund. Currently it’s trading at $82.47 and that puts it on the high side of its mid-range of the 52 week range. The dividend is $2.96/share (yield of 3.58%) and the expense ratio is a happy 0.06%. This is one that I may increase my position by a few shares.

I don’t have much to say about VFIAX because it is on auto-pilot within my 401K account. I am still fairly new to this investment process so I don’t have much on how I am doing on the amount of dividends I have been paid. Stay tuned for new updates as they develop.

More About My Investing Strategy

I’m going to expand on the details of my investing strategy. Previous posts I have stated which stocks I prefer and basic outline of my criteria in selecting specific stocks to buy. Again, I’m going to state that I am a dividend investor and not a value investor. In my mind, the essential difference is that the value investor focuses on share price of the stock. The dividend investor focuses on whether the company issuing the stock pays dividends or not. I know that this is a very simplistic view, but bear with me.

As a dividend investor the price per share isn’t ignored. But it isn’t the primary importance. Just like the value investor, the dividends paid are not ignored, either, it’s just not as important as the price. The value investor looks for pure growth (i.e. increases in share price) even though they may plan on holding the stock for years. That’s how they view their stock holdings.

Dividend investors, at least for me, look at stocks growing in value also, but I also look at increasing the number of shares increasing by reinvesting those dividends that I receive. Value investors look to increase their stock ownership by additional purchases of the stock, especially during a DIP (Drop In Price). Again, this is another oversimplification.

To me the goal is to increase the number of shares I won with the minimal cost to me. Like a value investor, I will buy additional shares of stock on a DIP, otherwise I maintain my Divident ReInvestment Plan (DRIP). Basically, maximizing benefits and minimizing costs. When I review any potential stock to purchase I look at many factors.

  1. Does the company issue dividends? If no, I then move on to the next potential stock.
  2. If the company pays dividends, how much does it pay?
  3. How frequently does it pay dividends? Quarterly, monthly?
  4. What is the 5 Yr dividend growth?
  5. How long has it been paying dividends?

Once I get the answers to these basic questions, I look at the stock price. I then go through the similar analysis that a value investor goes through to determine if it is a stock to invest in or not. The stock may be one that I don’t feel is right for me at this point in time so I may put it on my Watchlist. Additionally, my strategy doesn’t just deal with buying stocks, I also have a strategy for when I should be selling. Because I am a dividend investor, dividends are key. If a company cuts/reduces their dividends two (2) period in a row, it becomes a prime candidate to be sold. I will now review the numbers in a different light and look at the stock to determine if there is a chance for the dividends to rebound. If in the they reduce it a third time or eliminate dividends, it becomes an automatic sell.

That’s my strategy for dividend investing in a nutshell. You may agree with it or you may not, but it is MINE. I really don’t have a hard and steadfast set of numbers for any of the quantitative elements. It really comes down to what I am comfortable with when I look at the numbers. To me stock selection is a subjective process, unique to the person. I may decide one way about a certain stock and you may decide another way. It has to do with how much risk you are willing to tolerate. Part of my strategy is to avoid high risk investments. How much risk am I willing to take on? Again, it’s subjective. I prefer ETFs over individual stocks for that very reason. If I buy individual stocks, I prefer an established company to a start-up. My tolerance of risk is tied to my timeline, which is now short. So, I don’t have much time to recover from any massive losses that I may incur. And lastly, my investment strategy is a “living thing”. As I progress and learn my investment strategy evolves and changes.

You can look at investment strategies from multiple people and take-away what you feel comfortable with and what lines up with your goals. Don’t let anyone else dictate what your strategy should be because if you find someone that tries to pressure you into adopting their strategy, keep digging and you’ll find out what their hidden agenda is.

VDE vs. QYLD

I’m always on the lookout for ETFs to add to my investment portfolio. I came across 2 that I thought were possible candidates. Because I have a limited amount of money to invest, I tend to limit myself to 1 stock investment during my investment period. Currently, my eye is on these 2. Both are consistent performers in term of dividends.

  1. VDE (Vanguard Energy ETF) – VDE tracks a market-cap-weighted index of US energy companies. The index includes those companies deemed investable by MSCI and covers 98% of the market. The fund invests in stocks of companies operating across energy sectors. It invests in growth and value stocks of companies across diversified market capitalization. This fund will allow me to diversify my portfolio to include energy stocks. As the name implied, this fund was created and managed by Vanguard (which I tend to prefer) back in 2004. Cost ratio is around .10%, which is a bit higher than I prefer. The fund is designated as an average risk (all investment entail a certain amount of risk, nothing is a sure thing). And lastly, the key factor to me is the dividend yield and dividend payout which is 5.69% and $2.74, respectively. The 5 year growth rate is a modest 4.73%. The current share price is $48.46. Which would not allow me to maximize my share ownership with my limited funds. $100 investment would only get me 2.06 shares. At the current dividend payout amount this would give me $5.65 in dividends.
  2. QYLD (Global X NASDAQ 100 Covered Call ETF) – The investment seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, generally to the price and yield performance of the CBOE NASDAQ-100® BuyWrite V2 Index (the “underlying index”).The fund will invest at least 80% of its total assets in the securities of the underlying index. The CBOE NASDAQ-100® BuyWrite Index is a benchmark index that measures the performance of a theoretical portfolio that holds a portfolio of the stocks included in the NASDAQ-100® Index, and “writes” (or sells) a succession of one-month at-the-money NASDAQ-100® Index covered call options. It is non-diversified. The cost ratio is around 0.60% (a bit high for me) but the dividend yield and payout are 11.78% and $2.55, respectively, which is better than most % yields. There is no data for the 5 year growth rate. The investment risk is above average but the return is considered high. This fund was started in 2013. Lastly, the current share price is $21.69. This is a better price in terms of maximizing share ownership. $100 investment will get you 4.61 shares. At the current dividend payout amount this would give me $10.97 in dividends.

From the start I’m going to tell you that I like Vanguard funds and tend to gravitate toward them. I’m not saying that Vanguard funds are better than Fidelity or others, just that I like them better than the others. Another factor that goes into my decisions is that I try to avoid risks in my investments. All investments have a certain level of risk associated with them and I try to minimize those whenever I can. I tend to stay away from high risk investments and investment activities (i.e. day trading, value investing, etc.) for no other reason that I’m at an age where I may not have the luxury of recouping any losses that I incur. Again, with all investments there is always a possibility of incurring losses but those, again, I try to minimize/avoid. I don’t gamble. I live in an area where I am no more than an hour away from a casino, yet I can’t remember that last time I was in one.

Another factor that affects my decisions is that I love dividends, consistent dividends. If one of my funds cuts their dividend payout two time within the same period, they become a prime candidate for me to sell. I’m in it for the income. My goal is to replace my current wages with income from my investments so that I can stop having to get up and go to work. Additionally, if I should die the income from the investments, if left alone, would be enough to sustain my wife. So I like dividend investments with dividend that pay consistently and grow.

So, based on many factors and data, including my investment goals and preferences, I’ll probably go with VDE.

This is NOT a recommendation to buy or not buy a certain ETF stock. This post is just a collections of information and thoughts that I had when I was going through to determine which ETF stock to invest in. This post is not intended to be any kind of financial analysis for evaluating specific ETF stocks, other than for myself and to show others what kind of evaluation I go through.

Avoid the pitfalls of investing

Do You Want To Learn To Put Together A Portfolio For Big Dividends?

If you’re interested to learn how to put together a portfolio for big dividends then you need to start with this video. Like you, I’m in the process if learning everything I can about dividend investing. As I go through them I’ll feature the ones that I feel are the most useful and informative. If you want to see what other videos are available from Learn to Invest, click here. Enjoy the video.

My Current Holdings

stock_market

A few people have asked me what stocks & funds have I am invested in.  As I have stated in previous posts I tend to lean toward funds (mutual & index), ETFs, and REITs.  I’m seriously contemplating to expand to other areas.

Currently, I am invested in:

On Robinhood –
$ABR
$ACRE
$OBLN

I’m looking to add either $BEP or $T.  Both pay good dividends.

On TD Ameritrade –
$VNQ
$VYM

Here I’m looking to add QYLD.

My mutual fund stock is on Raymond James –
$FKUVBX

And lastly my 401K on PCS –
$VFIAX

Why so many different accounts?  Because each serves a different purpose.  Robinhood & TD Ameritrade are the only ones that I actively trade stocks on.  PCS holds my 401K from my job and the company decided that is where they want those shares to be managed.  Raymond James was one I added for my retirement distribution from a corporation that I use to work for and vested my retirement fund.  I’ll leave that one there until the end of 5 years.