Tag Archives: risk tolerance

Which Portfolio Mix, Is Best For You?

Guest Article By Richard Brody 

When, it comes to investing, and/ or, personal financial planning, there is no such thing, as, one – size – fits – all! Depending on one’s age, needs, goals, priorities, risk tolerance, purposes, etc, the most appropriate strategy, may be determined, on a case – by – case, basis! Your total assets, liquid assets, income (from a variety of sources), job security, reserves, and personal, comfort zone/ level, are significant factors, to determine, the best path forward, for you, in terms of creating a personal, investment portfolio. With that in mind, this article will attempt to, briefly, consider, examine, review, and discuss, which, mix, might make the most sense, for your specific combination, and set of conditions, and factors.

1. Risk tolerance: One of the first things to consider, is, your personal, risk tolerance. That means, in simple – terms, how might you balance, investing, and being able, to sleep, at night! Many people confuse terms, especially, when it comes to, mixing – up, the difference, between, growth, and income. How often have you heard, someone, declare, the growth – investments, they held, didn’t offer enough income, and/ or, income – focused investments don’t provide growth/ rising prices, etc? One must consider, how much risk, they are ready, willing, and/ or, able, to tolerate, and accept!

2. Goals/ objectives: Identify, clearly, your individual goals, and objectives, when considering your portfolio mix. Some goals, include: saving for a child’s education; creating a source, to purchase a future house; developing a retirement fund; etc. It makes sense, usually, to carefully, choose, the right mix of investments, for each objective. Achieving goals, generally, is easier/ simpler, when done, over a longer – period of time, so one might take advantage of the concept of Dollar Cost Averaging. This approach, often, minimizes overall – market risk, because, when purchases are made, at a specific point, every month, market fluctuation becomes far – less, relevant and significant!

3. Needs: We are individuals, and have our own needs! Avoid, trying to, Keep Up With The Joneses, because, what might make sense, for them, may not, for you, and what you need! Do you need, growth, present income, future income, or some combination, etc?

4. Small, versus, Large – Cap, equity: We often hear the terms, small – cap, versus, large – cap. This refers to the amount of capitalization, of the individual company, investment, or mutual fund. The value, and monetary stability, and strength of any company, may be a factor, in the safety, etc.

5. Bonds and Preferred Stock: Corporate bonds are debt, which companies use, to raise monies/ capital. Some are unsecured ones, but, generally, we consider, secured bonds (debentures), which are backed, by the finances of that company. Therefore, while, many consider, bonds, safe, that depends on, the quality of the specific company. Preferred stocks are generally, favored forms of equity, and pay a regular dividend. Most people, who invest in these two types of investments, seek consistent income. At this point – in – time, because of record – low, interest rates, existing bond prices, are high, because they were issued, when rates were higher, and the price of the bond, is adjusted, because, it determines the total yield.

The more you know, and understand, the better, you will determine the portfolio mix, which might, best serve your individual needs, goals, and priorities. Become a smarter investor!

Richard has owned businesses, been a COO, CEO, Director of Development, consultant, professionally run events, consulted to thousands, conducted personal development seminars, and was involved in financial planning, for 4 decades. Rich has written three books and thousands of articles. His company, PLAN2LEAD, LLC has an informative website http://plan2lead.net and Plan2lead can also be followed on Facebook http://facebook.com/Plan2lead

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Richard_Brody/492539

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More About My Investing Strategy

I’m going to expand on the details of my investing strategy. Previous posts I have stated which stocks I prefer and basic outline of my criteria in selecting specific stocks to buy. Again, I’m going to state that I am a dividend investor and not a value investor. In my mind, the essential difference is that the value investor focuses on share price of the stock. The dividend investor focuses on whether the company issuing the stock pays dividends or not. I know that this is a very simplistic view, but bear with me.

As a dividend investor the price per share isn’t ignored. But it isn’t the primary importance. Just like the value investor, the dividends paid are not ignored, either, it’s just not as important as the price. The value investor looks for pure growth (i.e. increases in share price) even though they may plan on holding the stock for years. That’s how they view their stock holdings.

Dividend investors, at least for me, look at stocks growing in value also, but I also look at increasing the number of shares increasing by reinvesting those dividends that I receive. Value investors look to increase their stock ownership by additional purchases of the stock, especially during a DIP (Drop In Price). Again, this is another oversimplification.

To me the goal is to increase the number of shares I won with the minimal cost to me. Like a value investor, I will buy additional shares of stock on a DIP, otherwise I maintain my Divident ReInvestment Plan (DRIP). Basically, maximizing benefits and minimizing costs. When I review any potential stock to purchase I look at many factors.

  1. Does the company issue dividends? If no, I then move on to the next potential stock.
  2. If the company pays dividends, how much does it pay?
  3. How frequently does it pay dividends? Quarterly, monthly?
  4. What is the 5 Yr dividend growth?
  5. How long has it been paying dividends?

Once I get the answers to these basic questions, I look at the stock price. I then go through the similar analysis that a value investor goes through to determine if it is a stock to invest in or not. The stock may be one that I don’t feel is right for me at this point in time so I may put it on my Watchlist. Additionally, my strategy doesn’t just deal with buying stocks, I also have a strategy for when I should be selling. Because I am a dividend investor, dividends are key. If a company cuts/reduces their dividends two (2) period in a row, it becomes a prime candidate to be sold. I will now review the numbers in a different light and look at the stock to determine if there is a chance for the dividends to rebound. If in the they reduce it a third time or eliminate dividends, it becomes an automatic sell.

That’s my strategy for dividend investing in a nutshell. You may agree with it or you may not, but it is MINE. I really don’t have a hard and steadfast set of numbers for any of the quantitative elements. It really comes down to what I am comfortable with when I look at the numbers. To me stock selection is a subjective process, unique to the person. I may decide one way about a certain stock and you may decide another way. It has to do with how much risk you are willing to tolerate. Part of my strategy is to avoid high risk investments. How much risk am I willing to take on? Again, it’s subjective. I prefer ETFs over individual stocks for that very reason. If I buy individual stocks, I prefer an established company to a start-up. My tolerance of risk is tied to my timeline, which is now short. So, I don’t have much time to recover from any massive losses that I may incur. And lastly, my investment strategy is a “living thing”. As I progress and learn my investment strategy evolves and changes.

You can look at investment strategies from multiple people and take-away what you feel comfortable with and what lines up with your goals. Don’t let anyone else dictate what your strategy should be because if you find someone that tries to pressure you into adopting their strategy, keep digging and you’ll find out what their hidden agenda is.