Tag Archives: vanguard funds

What about Bonds.

As I said previously, I’m a novice investor who is still “learning the ropes” about investing. As I read and watch tutorial videos I learn what I am doing correctly, incorrectly, and how to improve my portfolio.
This last one if the important part. As I was reviewing some information about portfolio management, being a senior who is looking to finally reap what I sow, I was confronted with the analysis that my portfolio needed to be tweaked some more. I was informed that as I got older that I should be invested more in bonds in order to offset and protect my overall investment assets. My current portfolio is all stocks & stock funds. No bonds or bond funds. So, now I need to modify my investment strategy and look to invest more in the bond market without sacrificing my other holdings.

I’m seriously looking at VTIP and VTEB. Again, I prefer funds to individual holdings. Both seem to be good acquisitions; VTIP is trading at $50.92/share and at the high end of its 52 week range. The Distribution Yield for VTIP is 1.57% with an expense ratio of 0.05%. VTIP is rated as low risk along with a below average return rating.

VTEB is trading at $54.74 with the price being at it high end of the 52 week range, also. The Distribution Yield is a bit better at 2.15% while the expense ratio is at 0.06%. VTEB is rated as average risk with a rating of average for returns. Everything else being equal, in my mind, VTEB (Vanguard Tax-Exempt Bond Index Fund ETF Shares) seems to beat out VTIP (Vanguard Short-Term Inflation-Protected Securities Index Fund ETF). This insight is based on my criteria that I use to determine which funds to buy. It may not necessarily be what you would decide. Every investor has to make their own determination and this post just give a general outline of how I do mine.

VHT vs. VGT; Adding a New Sector To My Portfolio

For those that follow my blog and my Twitter feeds, you are aware that my current portfolio is heavy with ETFs, About 82% of my investment portfolio consists of ETFs and the balance of 17% are individual company stocks. Within those ETFs I have the following areas invested in:

  1. Real Estate – VNQ (Vanguard Real Estate ETF).
  2. Energy – VDE (Vanguard Energy ETF)

The other 2 Vanguard funds are concentrated on high value & high dividends across many sectors (VFIAX & VYM).

I would like to add a healthcare ETF and a technology ETF to my portfolio. I am looking at VGT and VHT. Both are pricey by my standards but both are paying decent dividends, and that what I in this for. So, I now have to go through the decision process of which one do I invest in first. I will be investing in both but it’ll be completed over the next few months. I do have other expenses that I am obligated to handle first.

medical caduceus black white outline clipart

I looked at the data for VHT (Vanguard Health Care ETF) via my TD Ameritrade account. Currently the fund is trading at $204.84 per share which is a bit high for my purposes. In looking at this fund’s 52 week range you see that its share price is at the end of the high range. The chart shows the fund’s value is increasing so I doubt that the price will be dropping drastically, barring any unforeseen circumstances. But now for the key question. What about the dividends? VHT has an annualized payout of $2.55/share (a 1.24% yield). If the share price were to drop to the other end of the price spectrum of $138.11 the yield would then be 1.85%. The average 5 year dividend growth rate is 23.01%.

According to Morningstar the risk factor for this fund shows that it’s rated as Below Average and the returns are rated as Average. Both of which are a positive factor for me. Morningstar has the fund designated as a Large Blend fund. The one thing that I am not happy with for this fund is that the Net Expense Ratio is about 0.10%. This is the maximum I would prefer.

The market Return for the funds is 6.39% so far for 2020, For 2019 it was 21.86%. Some of the company stocks that are included in this fund are:

  1. JNJ – Johnson & Johnson
  2. UNH – UnitedHealth Group
  3. PFE – Pfizer Inc
  4. MRK – Merck & Co Inc
  5. ABT – Abbott Laboratories
  6. TMO – Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc
  7. ABBV – AbbVie Inc
  8. AMGN – Amgen Inc
  9. BMY – Bristol-Myers Squibb Co
  10. MDT – Medtronic PLC

cloud computing clipart

The other Vanguard fund that I checked out on TD Ameritrade was VGT (Vanguard Information Technology Index Fund ETF). This fund is another pricey one that is trading at its 52 week high range of $313.59, Morningstar has this fund rated Below Average risk and Above Average return. They also have it designated as a Large Growth fund.

In digging into the data for this fund I find that the dividend payout is annualized at $3.00/share (a 0.96% yield). In screening just for high paying dividend stock with a yield greater than 5%, this fund would not have shown up on my radar. But is still pays a decent dividend even if the share price makes it a challenge for the average person to purchase more than just a couple of shares. The Net Expense ratio is also at the maximum preferred ratio of 0.10%.

The returns for this fund for 2020 so far are 21.33%. For 2019 the returns were 48.61. Some of the company stocks that are included in this fund are:

  1. AAPL – Apple
  2. MSFT – Microsoft
  3. V – Visa
  4. MA – Mastercard
  5. NVDA – Nvidia
  6. PYPL – PayPal
  7. ADBE – Adobe
  8. INTC – Intel
  9. CSCO – Cisco
  10. CRM – Salesforce

I really like both of these funds but I can’t afford to buy both of them at this time. So, I have to make a decision which one I want to buy first. It comes down to 2 factors: a) share price, and b) dividend payout (after all, that’s what I’m interested in). They’re both pretty close in both of these areas.

The final decision at this time for me will be that I will be buying the funds in this order:

  1. VHT (Vanguard Health Care ETF)
  2. VGT (Vanguard Information Technology Index Fund ETF)

My ETF Portfolio

I was glad to see that my Vanguard ETF portfolio grew in value. Even though I’m investing for the long term benefits, I just wanted to check and see what the funds were doing. I have another portfolio of individual stocks I am invested in but the ETF portfolio hold the most promise. My ETF portfolio currently holds the following ETFs:

  1. VDE – Vanguard Energy
  2. VNQ – Vanguard Real Estate
  3. VYM – Vanguard High Dividend Yield

Yes, they are all Vanguard funds. I have a preference for Vanguard. This is not to say any others one, like Fidelity, are worse but I just prefer Vanguard. Checking today’s market value and I find that the portfolio has increased by +3.07%. I won’t have a comparison with the S&P 500 or the NASDAQ Composite until the end of the day. I’ll be check back then.

I only started on my investment journey since the beginning of the year with ETFs and stocks. Last year I started my 401K with my employer. What’s in my 401K?

  1. VFIAX – Vanguard 500 Index Fund Admiral Shares

Now, I look at other factors with my funds to decide if I increase my position with any or all of them or look for another investment (except the VFIAX, which is automatically invested into).

  1. VDE is currently trading at $48.85. This toward the low end of its 52 week range. I may end up buying a couple of more shares of this fund. The expense ratio is high for my liking (0.10%) but the fund pays $2.74/share (a yield of 5.61%). VDE invests in giant-cap and large-cap U.S. energy stocks.
  2. VNQ is trading at $80.71 which is right in the mid-range of the 52 week range. This one is one that I’ll keep an eye on. I’m not overly happy with the expense ratio of 0.12% but the dividend paid is $3.11/share (a yield of 3.85%). Situations do change so this one will stay on HOLD.
  3. VYM is my pride & joy. I love this fund. Currently it’s trading at $82.47 and that puts it on the high side of its mid-range of the 52 week range. The dividend is $2.96/share (yield of 3.58%) and the expense ratio is a happy 0.06%. This is one that I may increase my position by a few shares.

I don’t have much to say about VFIAX because it is on auto-pilot within my 401K account. I am still fairly new to this investment process so I don’t have much on how I am doing on the amount of dividends I have been paid. Stay tuned for new updates as they develop.

VDE vs. QYLD

I’m always on the lookout for ETFs to add to my investment portfolio. I came across 2 that I thought were possible candidates. Because I have a limited amount of money to invest, I tend to limit myself to 1 stock investment during my investment period. Currently, my eye is on these 2. Both are consistent performers in term of dividends.

  1. VDE (Vanguard Energy ETF) – VDE tracks a market-cap-weighted index of US energy companies. The index includes those companies deemed investable by MSCI and covers 98% of the market. The fund invests in stocks of companies operating across energy sectors. It invests in growth and value stocks of companies across diversified market capitalization. This fund will allow me to diversify my portfolio to include energy stocks. As the name implied, this fund was created and managed by Vanguard (which I tend to prefer) back in 2004. Cost ratio is around .10%, which is a bit higher than I prefer. The fund is designated as an average risk (all investment entail a certain amount of risk, nothing is a sure thing). And lastly, the key factor to me is the dividend yield and dividend payout which is 5.69% and $2.74, respectively. The 5 year growth rate is a modest 4.73%. The current share price is $48.46. Which would not allow me to maximize my share ownership with my limited funds. $100 investment would only get me 2.06 shares. At the current dividend payout amount this would give me $5.65 in dividends.
  2. QYLD (Global X NASDAQ 100 Covered Call ETF) – The investment seeks to provide investment results that closely correspond, before fees and expenses, generally to the price and yield performance of the CBOE NASDAQ-100® BuyWrite V2 Index (the “underlying index”).The fund will invest at least 80% of its total assets in the securities of the underlying index. The CBOE NASDAQ-100® BuyWrite Index is a benchmark index that measures the performance of a theoretical portfolio that holds a portfolio of the stocks included in the NASDAQ-100® Index, and “writes” (or sells) a succession of one-month at-the-money NASDAQ-100® Index covered call options. It is non-diversified. The cost ratio is around 0.60% (a bit high for me) but the dividend yield and payout are 11.78% and $2.55, respectively, which is better than most % yields. There is no data for the 5 year growth rate. The investment risk is above average but the return is considered high. This fund was started in 2013. Lastly, the current share price is $21.69. This is a better price in terms of maximizing share ownership. $100 investment will get you 4.61 shares. At the current dividend payout amount this would give me $10.97 in dividends.

From the start I’m going to tell you that I like Vanguard funds and tend to gravitate toward them. I’m not saying that Vanguard funds are better than Fidelity or others, just that I like them better than the others. Another factor that goes into my decisions is that I try to avoid risks in my investments. All investments have a certain level of risk associated with them and I try to minimize those whenever I can. I tend to stay away from high risk investments and investment activities (i.e. day trading, value investing, etc.) for no other reason that I’m at an age where I may not have the luxury of recouping any losses that I incur. Again, with all investments there is always a possibility of incurring losses but those, again, I try to minimize/avoid. I don’t gamble. I live in an area where I am no more than an hour away from a casino, yet I can’t remember that last time I was in one.

Another factor that affects my decisions is that I love dividends, consistent dividends. If one of my funds cuts their dividend payout two time within the same period, they become a prime candidate for me to sell. I’m in it for the income. My goal is to replace my current wages with income from my investments so that I can stop having to get up and go to work. Additionally, if I should die the income from the investments, if left alone, would be enough to sustain my wife. So I like dividend investments with dividend that pay consistently and grow.

So, based on many factors and data, including my investment goals and preferences, I’ll probably go with VDE.

This is NOT a recommendation to buy or not buy a certain ETF stock. This post is just a collections of information and thoughts that I had when I was going through to determine which ETF stock to invest in. This post is not intended to be any kind of financial analysis for evaluating specific ETF stocks, other than for myself and to show others what kind of evaluation I go through.

Avoid the pitfalls of investing

Why I Prefer Mutual Funds & ETFs

As I mentioned previously, before you start investing you should spend some time learning the different options available to investors. One option is to invest in stocks. Another is to invest in mutual funds and ETF (exchange traded funds). Just so you have a basic understanding of those 2 options, let me recap:

ETF – “An exchange traded fund (ETF) is a type of security that involves a collection of securities—such as stocks—that often tracks an underlying index, although they can invest in any number of industry sectors or use various strategies. ETFs are in many ways similar to mutual funds; however, they are listed on exchanges and ETF shares trade throughout the day just like ordinary stock.”

Mutual Funds – “A mutual fund is a type of financial vehicle made up of a pool of money collected from many investors to invest in securities like stocks, bonds, money market instruments, and other assets. Mutual funds are operated by professional money managers, who allocate the fund’s assets and attempt to produce capital gains or income for the fund’s investors. A mutual fund’s portfolio is structured and maintained to match the investment objectives stated in its prospectus.”

I prefer these because they include multiple stocks, not just a single stock. If you buy one stock and its share price tanks or the company ceases to exist then you have nothing. With mutual funds and ETFs there are multiple companies within the funds so if one starts to tank it can be replaced with a better performing one. You don’t lose that much value or shares.

With a single stock if the company decides to split its shares your stock price get diluted (price per share goes down). If the company does a reverse split you end up with less shares (not good if you’re looking for dividend income). With MF (mutual funds) & ETF (exchange traded funds) you never see this because these funds are managed for you. You do pay a small fee for this service but as long as the activity within the fund is low, so is the fee.

I do own a couple of individual stocks but the majority of my investment activities are with mutual funds and ETFs. I invest my 401K money with Vanguard 500 Index Fund Admiral Shares. My ETF investments are with Vanguard Real Estate ETF and Vanguard High Dividend Yield ETF. Yiu can pretty much surmise that I lean toward Vanguard funds. It’s pretty much a hands-off situation with those investments. I just invest more when I have the funds available and make sure I buy at the lowest price possible. That’s not saw that I don’t review the status of those funds but I don’t feel I have a need to be tinkering around with them.

I also have money invested in a mutual fund with my bank, FT Innovative Technology (FKUVBX). Again, I don’t concern myself as much with the share price as I am with the dividend payout. Especially with the mutual fund because the you need a minimum/increment of $1000 to add to the fund. This, to me, is the one drawback with mutual funds. At this time I can’t come up with $1000 to add to the fund. My investment fund is increased by $60-$200 at a time. Whenever I transfer any amount into the investment account, I like to have the money invested within a few days. I prefer to have my money working for me instead of just sitting and “collecting dust”.

So, to recap my basic strategy:
1. I want to add money into my investment funds in order to have funds available to increase my current holdings or to take advantage of a unique opportunity.
2. I want to invest in stocks that have a high dividend yield.
3. I prefer individual stocks to be priced below $20/share and ETFs to be priced below $100/share. The purpose here is to maximize the number of shares owned. I will trade off a higher price per share for higher dividend yield.
4. In the short term (within the next 5 years), reinvest the dividend back into the stock/fund. Grow the amount of shares owned.
5. View drops in price for shares as opportunities to increase number of shares owned because dividends are paid per share.
6. Keep a watchful eye on the declared dividend amount. If a company reduces the amount paid twice in a row, stock is a candidate for replacement. This only applies to individual stocks owned. Mutual funds and exchange traded funds are managed for you.